Working time accounts in the public- and private sector: flexible working hours are becoming increasingly important

More and more companies and administrations offer their employees working time accounts. Between 1999 and 2016, the proportion of companies using this instrument has almost doubled. Above all, models that enable a short-term adjustment of work-input are particularly widespread. By contrast, long-term accounts, which facilitate longer leave periods including family leave, remain the exception.


Walking between the worlds – labour market economist and former Secretary of State Pedro S. Martins

  Pedro S. Martins is an expert spanning boundaries between science and politics: Martins, who is now doing research at Queen Mary University of London, was Secretary of State in the Ministry for Economics and Employment of his home country Portugal from 2011 until 2013.  At a time when unemployment, especially among the youth, achieved a record read full article


The impact of the digital revolution on the labour market: an interview with IAB Director Joachim Möller

Is the digital revolution a job-destroyer or a job-creator? How will it change traditional occupational images? In an interview to the IAB-Forum magazine, IAB Director Joachim Möller discusses these questions and argues for a “flexibility compromise” between the social partners as a strategy to organize the consequences of technological change on the labour market in a read full article


Should the US introduce a dual vocational training system following the German example? Four questions to IAB researcher Simon Janssen

In an article in the renowned Wall Street Journal of 8 September 2016 (“Germany offers a promising jobs model”), the American labour market economist Edward Lazear and the IAB researcher Simon Janssen recommend that the US introduce a dual vocational training system following the German example. The US economist Erik A. Hanushek clearly objected to read full article


Active labour market policy in Germany: an interview with IAB Director Joachim Möller

Active labour market policy plays an important role in Germany. In an interview to the IAB-Forum magazine, IAB Director Joachim Möller discusses its underlying principles such as the idea of “demanding and supporting” (Fordern und Fördern). He emphasizes the fact that evaluation results tend to have a significant impact on the design of labour market policies. In read full article


The dual apprenticeship system in Germany: an interview with IAB Director Joachim Möller

Youth unemployment in Germany is very low by international standards. In an interview to the IAB-Forum magazine, IAB Director Joachim Möller attributes this success to three factors: the favourable economic situation, the introduction of “youth employment advisory services” (Jugendberufsagenturen) supporting the transition from school to employment and, in particular, the well-established system of dual vocational training, read full article


Refugees and migration in Germany: an interview with IAB Director Joachim Möller

In recent years, Germany has taken in a great number of people who abandoned their home countries fleeing from the war, political persecution and economic hardship. In 2015, the number of those who fled to Germany amounted to almost one million which is a historic record high. Integration of these people into the labour market read full article


The German minimum wage: an interview with IAB Director Joachim Möller

After many years of debates, 2015 saw the introduction of a statutory minimum wage of € 8.50 per hour (€ 8.84 since 2017) in Germany. While opponents of the minimum wage predicted negative effects on employment, some advocates expected the number of wage earners depending on social basic benefits to decrease significantly due to the minimum read full article


The German job miracle: an interview with IAB Director Joachim Möller

From “the sick man of Europe” to the “German job miracle”: the German labour market has been performing extraordinarily well since 2005. Even in the crisis year 2009, when Germany’s gross domestic product shrunk by more than 5 per cent, its employment level remained more or less stable. In an interview for this magazine, IAB Director Joachim read full article


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